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sparkle kitchen: double berry "rock" cakes

In the Dry Gables stories, John Bernard Bauer — a stone mason, sculptor, and now writer — remembers all the stories of his home town: Dry Gables, South Dakota. In “A Single Stack of Stones,” his first story, J.B. tells of how he helped his mother find her way home by carefully building a stack of stones to guide her.

Inspired by J.B.'s stack of stones, this week's recipe will help you make your own stack of rocks — the edible kind!

“Rock cakes” may sound a bit like something that would send you to the dentist, but don't worry — it's really just the British name for drop scones. And by using the clever trick of freezing these rock cakes on individual squares of parchment, as set out below, you can make up a big batch when you have time, and bake them off as needed.

Tender, buttery, and bursting with fresh berries, these cakes are a perfect way to welcome someone home — just like J.B.'s stack of stones.


Double Berry “Rock” Cakes

(Makes about 1 dozen)

double berry

Ingredients

3 cups flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

2 sticks unsalted butter, slightly softened

½ cup sugar, plus extra for sprinkling on top

½ teaspoon almond extract

⅓ cup milk

1 scant cup (about 100 grams) chopped strawberries

½ scant cup (about 50 grams) blueberries

Directions double berry

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside. Cut the butter into cubes, and add it, along with the sugar, to the bowl of a stand mixer. Mix until pale and fluffy.

double berry

Meanwhile, gently whisk the eggs. When the butter and sugar are combined, slowly add the eggs with the mixer running. The mixture will look very gloopy at this point.

double berry

Once all the eggs are added, mix in the almond extract. Making sure the mixer is on low, add in about two-thirds of the flour, then the milk. Pull the bowl off of the stand mixer and gently mix in the rest of flour and the berries by hand.

double berry

Scoop the batter onto a parchment covered bake sheet in about ⅓-cup portions.

double berry

Freeze the scones for a few hours, then snip apart the parchment paper they're on so that each scone has a little square of parchment still attached. Put the scones into a freezer bag and keep frozen until you're ready to bake them.

double berry

When you're hungry for a scone, pull one out of the freezer bag together with its piece of parchment. Pop the parchment and scone onto a baking sheet without thawing and bake at 375° until golden brown, about 25-30 minutes.

Print Recipe Here


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About the Author

Meryl Carver-Allmond
Sparkle Kitchen & Craft Blogger

The Sparkle Kitchen Series is created by Meryl Carver-Allmond.

Meryl lives in a hundred year old house near the prairie with her sweet husband, two pre-schoolers, one puppy, one gecko, and about ten chickens. While she's been writing since she could pick up a pen, in recent years she's discovered the joy of photography, too. She feels lucky to be able to combine those skills, along with a third passion--showing people that cooking for themselves can be healthy and fun--in her weekly Sparkle Kitchen posts.

When Meryl isn't writing for Sparkle Kitchen, you can find her on her personal blog, My Bit of Earth, where she writes about chickens, babies, knitting, gardening, food, photography, and whatever else tickles her fancy on any given day.


About Dry Gables

"Dry Gables" is a unique series of stories centered around the people who live and work in a gold-rush era small town in South Dakota. Each of the characters has their own reason for coming to Dry Gables and each offers an essential ingredient to the town's well being. Every character embodies a way of being in the world - with unique behaviors, motivations and fears. Is your child having a defiant, stubborn and overall challenging morning? Well, perhaps she is feeling like Johann, the blacksmith, and needs to feel independent and powerful. Is your child quietly sitting in the corner during school playtime? Well perhaps he is feeling like Seamus O'Conner, the schoolteacher, who needs to be seen for his unique strengths and talents. Every character embodies a way of being in the world - with unique behaviors, motivations and fears. Our aim is to give parents and educators clues into what lies behind certain behavior, and then offer ideas on how to meet the behavior and 'see' the child in a new light.